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Calculate your King County property taxes before you vote

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King County Assessor Launches Taxpayer Transparency Tool for November Election. Website Details Cost of Proposed Ballot Measures By Household. (photo: KOMO News)

There's an old adage that "knowing is half the battle."

King County Assessor John Wilson has unveiled a new web page allowing King County voters and property owners to see how any proposed property tax increase will impact their rent or mortgage.

https://www.kingcounty.gov/depts/assessor.aspx

Wilson today launched his November 2018 Taxpayer Transparency Tool, a website which provides each King County taxpayer an individualized accounting of where their property tax dollars go, and the estimated cost of any proposed property tax measure to be voted on.

“Taxpayers have a right to know where their money is going, and what each proposed property tax levy will cost them,” said Wilson. “Property taxes keep going up. We need to make sure the public understands why.”

“The Assessor’s new transparency tool will make it easier than ever for the people of King County to know how their property taxes are being invested and what portion is supporting local, regional, or state-wide infrastructure and services.” King County Executive Dow Constantine.

The tool was tested on a ballot measure in April during the special election and was widely available for the ballot measures appearing in the August primary. All county residents will be able to see how the various property tax measures on the ballot this November, including Seattle’s proposed renewal of the Families and Education Levy, will affect their tax bill. In addition to Seattle, property tax measures are also on the ballot and in the Tax Transparency Tool in the following areas:

• Mercer Island

• Bothell

• Fire District 45 (Duvall area)

• Si View Metropolitan Park District (North Bend area)

The Transparency Tool only shows the impact of property tax measures. Other ballot measures, including sales tax measures or benefit charges, are not included.

Wilson said there were several factors that led him to create this new tool:

• The property tax system in Washington State is complicated. This new tool allows voters to make informed decisions about ballot measures, and helps illustrate how our tax system works.

• News stories or other information about ballot measures typically use a median-value or average property as the example for the cost of the proposal. “The problem is most people don’t live in a median-value property, so those estimates just don’t seem as relevant,” Wilson said.

• The Assessor’s Office receives a number of inquiries via phone and email in the lead up to voting on property tax measures by residents wanting to know how much these measures will cost them. This tool will be an efficient and effective way to answer these questions, as residents can find the answer on-line whenever it is convenient for them – not just during normal business hours.

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